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HKBU and University of Connecticut collaborate to train sport administrators

14 Jan 2014

US participant Anthony Sanneh (right) who competed in the 2002 World Cup in South Korea teaches secondary students to play soccer
US participant Anthony Sanneh (right) who competed in the 2002 World Cup in South Korea teaches secondary students to play soccer
Participants pay a visit to Consulate General of United States in Hong Kong
Participants pay a visit to Consulate General of United States in Hong Kong

The Department of Physical Education and the Global Training and Development Institute of the University of Connecticut, USA, jointly held an International Sport Exchange Programme “Sport for Social Change” at HKBU from 2 to 12 January to train 20 selected sport administrators and physical educators from USA, Hong Kong and Mainland China.

 

This was HKBU’s first joint training programme in youth sport management with a US university and was funded by around US$225,000 from the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the US Department of State. The Hong Kong-based training programme was the second phase of a two-way educational and cultural exchange programme. The first phase was conducted between 30 June and 13 July 2013 in USA.

 

This programme aimed at increasing the professional capacities of youth sport managers and administrators in the design and management of youth sport programmes as well as advancing mutual cross-cultural understanding of the role of youth sport in educational success, psychosocial development and/or intercultural conflict resolution.

 

“The programme gave sport administrators an opportunity to exchange ideas and learn from one another’s experience, practice and culture,” said Professor Chung Pak-kwong, Programme Investigator and Professor of Department of Physical Education.

 

During the two-week exchange programme, participants visited sport facilities and sport organisations in Hong Kong, participated in panel discussions that facilitated cross-cultural dialogues on sport-based youth development, and went on a cultural tour of Hong Kong and Macau. Participants from USA also spent three days job shadowing in different youth sport organisations in Hong Kong and Mainland China and collaborated with their counterparts to launch grant sport-based youth development projects for youths aged seven to 17.