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HKBU sculptor inspires students with creative online modules

27 Apr 2020

Mr Altenburger shows students how to produce a sculpture using their body, a chair and an object.
Mr Altenburger shows students how to produce a sculpture using their body, a chair and an object.
Adding a house cat to the creation
Adding a house cat to the creation 
Using a doll as part of the sculpture
Using a doll as part of the sculpture
Graphite rubbing of the interior of an ice tray
Graphite rubbing of the interior of an ice tray
Expressing the feeling of toothache with one’s hands in a photographic series
Expressing the feeling of toothache with one’s hands in a photographic series

Despite the suspension of face-to-face classes during the COVID-19 outbreak, Mr Ekkehard Altenburger, Assistant Professor from the Academy of Visual Arts, has inspired his students with a series of specially-designed creative online teaching modules which have encouraged them to generate new ideas and use materials from their homes to create artworks. 

 

To teach the concepts of balance and positioning, which are fundamental elements in sculpture, Mr Altenburger instructed his students to produce sculptures using their bodies, a chair and an object. The challenge also had a twist, as the students were told that the chair could not be placed on the floor and that they could not hold the object with their hands. 

 

Another task instructed students to produce a graphite rubbing of a place or object. One student produced an amazing artwork by rubbing the interior of an ice tray with a pencil. Students were also asked to create an artwork with captions of poems or phrases. 

 

To maximise the teaching and learning outcomes, Mr Altenburger used both Zoom, a video communications platform, and Miro, a virtual whiteboard platform, to conduct his online classes. He also invited overseas artists to dial into his classes and share insights into their practice and experience.

 

“I had to put much more effort and time into preparing for my classes, but this resulted in exceptional attendance levels. Students also seemed to appreciate my efforts in keeping the class ‘active’,” he added.