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Dean of Business Professor Edward Snape delivers Chair Professorship Inaugural Lecture

26 Sep 2016

Professor Edward Snape elaborates on the pedagogical changes business schools may need to make at his Chair Professorship Inaugural Lecture
Professor Edward Snape elaborates on the pedagogical changes business schools may need to make at his Chair Professorship Inaugural Lecture

Professor Edward Snape, Dean of the School of Business and Chair Professor in Management, delivered his Chair Professorship Inaugural Lecture organised by the Institute of Creativity on 13 September 2016 on the topic of “Remaking business schools: what should we be doing and who should we be doing it with?”.

Professor Snape shared his insightful views on global trends in business education with an audience of some 200 academics, faculty members, students and the University community. He began the lecture with an overview of the challenges facing business schools worldwide, such as changing career patterns, the tendency for skills to become quickly obsolete, the possibility of “disruptive competition” from online courses as well as the challenge of maintaining students’ engagement on campus and of demonstrating research impact.

Professor Snape also highlighted the vision of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business for the future, which suggests that business schools need to become hubs of creativity and innovation, while at the same time expand so that there is room for diverse development, to define a specific positioning in order to differentiate themselves from competitors. He also advised that business schools should move towards closer, more cooperative relationships with their stakeholders, working not only with business organisations, but also with governments and the non-profit sector.

In addition, Professor Snape emphasised the indispensability of an excellent faculty team to the development of a business school. He opined that both the academic faculty and senior teaching faculty are important to lifting research and teaching excellence, and a school would do well to fully utilise the talents of existing faculty.

The lecture was sponsored by the Hung Hin Shiu Charitable Foundation.