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On Campus

University hosts forum on Chinese medicine clinical teaching

27 Mar 2013

(From left) Professor Bian Zhaoxiang, Mr. Andy Lee, Professor Yu Chau-leung, Mr. Wong Kit, Professor Ng Chung-nung and Professor Lu Aiping officiate at the forum's opening ceremony
(From left) Professor Bian Zhaoxiang, Mr. Andy Lee, Professor Yu Chau-leung, Mr. Wong Kit, Professor Ng Chung-nung and Professor Lu Aiping officiate at the forum's opening ceremony

The School of Chinese Medicine (SCM) held a forum on Chinese medicine clinical teaching last Saturday (23 March) with the aim of enhancing the standard of clinical teaching and training in Chinese medicine. Experts and scholars from renowned Chinese medicine hospitals and universities in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou and scholars from the three local institutions offering Chinese medicine programmes gathered to share experiences and exchange views on clinical teaching in Chinese medicine on the Mainland and in Hong Kong. The forum attracted some 250 experts, registered Chinese medicine practitioners as well as SCM teachers, students and alumni.

 

Officiating at the forum were Mr. Wong Kit, Chairman of the Chinese Medicine Practitioners Board of the Chinese Medicine Council of Hong Kong, Professor Yu Chau-leung, President of the Hong Kong Association for Integration of Chinese-Western Medicine, Professor Ng Chung-nung, President of the Hong Kong Federation of China of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Mr. Andy Lee, Vice-President (Administration) and Secretary of HKBU, Professor Lu Aiping, Dean of SCM of HKBU, and Professor Bian Zhaoxiang, Director of the Clinical Division of SCM and Associate Vice-President of HKBU.

 

In his speech, Mr. Andy Lee said that HKBU has been putting great effort into enhancing its Bachelor of Chinese Medicine and Bachelor of Science (Hons) in Biomedical Science programme, the first of its kind in Hong Kong, since its launch in 1998. SCM graduates have made substantial contributions to society and the development of Chinese medicine by serving in both private and Hospital Authority Chinese medicine clinics. Some of them have set up their own businesses and even provide Chinese medicine service overseas.

 

However, in view of the lack of a Chinese medicine hospital in Hong Kong, Chinese medicine students have had to undertake clinical practice on the Mainland. Stressing the urgent need for a Chinese medicine teaching hospital in Hong Kong, Mr. Lee explained that due to the differences in the healthcare systems of Hong Kong and the Mainland, the knowledge and experience the local students acquire on the Mainland cannot be fully applied in Hong Kong.

 

Professor Lu Aiping said clinical teaching is a crucial part of medical education, training Chinese medicine students to be good practitioners, and serves as an important base for providing qualified clinical services for the community. He expressed the hope that the forum would provide a good platform for the participants to exchange their valuable experiences and views on clinical teaching and clinical services in Hong Kong.

 

Speakers concurred that bedside teaching is of utmost importance in nurturing Chinese medicine students. Some of the speakers pointed out that in addition to passing on to students medical skills at the bedside, teachers have to impress upon them the importance of compassion in attending to patients.