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Professor Lu Aiping honoured with two academic awards for Chinese medicine standardisation

22 Feb 2016

Professor Lu Aiping’s dedication to the promotion of Chinese medicine standardisation is once again recognised with two academic awards for his outstanding contribution
Professor Lu Aiping’s dedication to the promotion of Chinese medicine standardisation is once again recognised with two academic awards for his outstanding contribution

Professor Lu Aiping, Dean of the School of Chinese Medicine was recently presented with the “Li Shizhen Innovation Award 2015” by the China Association of Chinese Medicine and the “Scientific and Technology Progress Award 2015” by the Chinese Association of Integrative Medicine respectively for his outstanding contribution to two Chinese medicine standardisation projects.

 

The “Li Shizhen Innovation Award” is in recognition of Professor Lu’s important contribution to the research and formulation of “Coding rules for Chinese medicines and their codes”, a set of national standards that has resulted in the unification of species, names and specifications of Chinese medicines. The implementation of the national standards, that took effect on 1 December 2015, helps promote the standardisation of Chinese medicines, strengthen the government’s regulation of the Chinese medicines market and enhance the safety and effectiveness of medicines for the benefit of the public.

 

Professor Lu also won the Science and Technology Progress Award from the Chinese Association of Integrative Medicine for his research team’s accomplishment in promoting Chinese medicine clinical standardisation achieved through the formulation of Chinese medicine clinical practice guidelines and the carrying out of evaluation studies in Mainland China. Commissioned by the Hospital Authority of Hong Kong, his team has also completed the drafting of a set of Chinese medicine clinical practice guidelines for three common diseases in Hong Kong, namely stroke, insomnia and chronic gastritis. The guidelines were drafted by adapting the clinical practice guidelines used on the Mainland on the basis of Chinese medicine practices in Hong Kong with a view to fostering the standardisation of Chinese medicine diagnosis.