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SCM research team wins Best Poster Award at National Congress of Autophagy

13 Sep 2017

The research team led by Professor Li Min (fourth from right) is delighted to win the Best Poster Award at the 1st National Congress of Autophagy
The research team led by Professor Li Min (fourth from right) is delighted to win the Best Poster Award at the 1st National Congress of Autophagy

Professor Li Min and her research team from the Mr and Mrs Ko Chi Ming Centre for Parkinson’s Disease Research, School of Chinese Medicine (SCM), recently attended the 1st National Congress of Autophagy held in Dalian, China, and won the Best Poster Award for the project entitled “NRBF2 is involved in the degradation process of APP-CTFs in Alzheimer disease models”. Presented by Dr Yang Chuanbin, one of the research team members, the poster was selected as one of the three best posters out of the pool of presentations at the symposium. The project was jointly conducted by Professor Li’s team together with Dr Lu Jiahong from the State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau.

 

Autophagy is a conserved process that degrades long-lived proteins and damaged organelles mediated by lysosomes, which is involved in many diseases including neurodegerative diseases. Professor Li’s team has been actively engaged in investigating the roles of autophagy dysfunctions in neurodegenerative diseases and the identification and development of novel autophagy regulators derived from Chinese medicines for the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). 

 

Accumulating evidence indicates that autophagy plays an important role in regulating Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis. Professor Li said: “We have found that NRBF2 (nuclear receptor binding factor 2), a key component and regulator of the PtdIns3K, is crucial in regulating amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) homeostasis via modulating autophagy. Our results suggest that modulation of NRBF2 may serve as a novel potential therapeutic target for regulating Aβ homeostasis and even AD treatment. This award attests to the hard work and advancement made by the School in the field of autophagy and neurodegenerative diseases at the international level.”